NZ Govt supports future agriculture emission science leaders

Thirty-one early-career scientists from 14 developing countries will each receive research scholarships to boost their scientific capability, with help from a New Zealand government-supported international PhD programme, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) said today.

The successful scholarship recipients for 2020 are being announced to coincide with the latest United Nations Climate Change Conference in Madrid.

The scholarships are being provided by the Climate, Food and Farming Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Development Scholarships programme, or CLIFF-GRADS.

CLIFF-GRADS is a joint initiative between the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (GRA) – in which New Zealand has a leading role – and the Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) programme of the Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research (CGIAR). Continue reading

AgResearch is part of team involved in break-through for agricultural methane mitigation

An international collaboration led by New Zealand scientists has made an important discovery in the quest to help lower methane emissions from animals. The findings have just been published online in the respected International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal. See here.

Methane emissions from animals account for around a third of New Zealand’s emissions. The animal itself does not produce methane; rather, a group of microbes, called methanogens, live in the stomach (rumen), and produce methane mainly from hydrogen and carbon dioxide when digesting feed.

The international team which involved researchers from AgResearch (New Zealand), the Universities of Otago (New Zealand), Monash (Australia), Illinois (USA) and Hokkaido (Japan) has for the first time identified the main rumen microbes and enzymes that both produce and consume that hydrogen. Continue reading